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20121027
20121104
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Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)
costs will surpass those from hurricanes irene and katrina. although there are countless businesses hurt, others could see a boost. erika miller reports. >> reporter: when you consider the massive amounts of flooding, downed trees, and damage to transportation networks, it could take days-- if not weeks, to tally up the financial costs from the storm. but already there are predictions sandy will be the most expensive clean-up in u.s. history. the most serious damage appears to be caused by flooding along the east coast. according to economic tracking firm i.h.s. global insight, property damage will likely surpass $20 billion. add to that as much as $30 billion in lost business, and the total financial toll could end up being close to $50 billion. hotels, stores, airlines, and restaurants have lost business they wot get back. insurance companies will have to make big payouts, which will likely mean higher insurance premiums for customers down the road. here in new york city, commerce has been crippled. and power is not expected to be restored in many areas until next week. i.h.s. global p
process while short term may be an issue for markets over the longer term as seen with katrina where you possibly could see better economic growth after this quarter. >> we'll see about that. that's a really important point. doug, only about one-third of the earnings have beaten expectations, lower than average of the past four quarters. is this an indication of what the markets are headed? we've got one month out of the three months for the fourth quarter in the books. what is your expectation for november and december? >> well i think the economy is slowing. that's clear and you know, when you're doing 1% or 2% gdp growth, it's tough to find 10% earnings growth by cutting expenses but ultimately i think the market's priced for that. we're not trading a market that's 20 times earnings, we're in a market that's 12 times earnings. i think expectations are low. if there was a surprise in october for us and it's something we've been hoping for, if you're at riverfront, you're going to see outperformance overseas so for four years the u.s. has kicked the rest of the world's butt, in other wo
katrina are inspiring one high school to come to the aid of hurricane sandy victims. help is on the way, and that's the message sent by errol heights students and faculty. the group is on a mission to send this semi-trailer stocked withed food, blankets and other helpful items. well, i'm lynn berry. this is "early today," just your first stop of the day today on your nbc station. >>> well, a dangerous fire forced officials to evacuate an entire town. close to 1,000 people received orders to abandon their homes. a chemical fire erupted from this derailed train car and then began leaking dangerous fumes. the evacuation order is still in effect until that fire burns out. >>> all right. new images show one animal's odd connection to halloween. a massachusetts fisherman caught this female lobster last week. look there. see? scientists say the crustacean, she is half orange, she's half black. the crustacean's split coloring happens every 50 to 100 million lobsters. that orange and black is the most common color combination. interesting. >>> well, class was in session when a drunken intruder b
's katrina, ike, andrew, irene, they're all late august or early september storms where the vacation industrial was more vulnerable. right now, it will be interesting to see the tradeoff from staples into discretionary spending. getting into the holiday season. >> just looking at the trading today, when you look at exposed sectors like insurance, retail and construction, do you think we'll get the moves that you would assume or not? >> i'd be careful expecting too big a move here. partly because of volumes, as i mentioned earlier. it's unclear about how exposed these stocks are going to be. i think expect some mixed messages here throughout the day. >> we're seeing certainly the insurers hold up well. there's a sense they may benefit from firmer pricing next year, something households should be aware of, potentially facing higher premiums as a result of this. >> very difficult to pull a trade out of the storm today. >> just one thing about gasoline, it seems to have already moved slightly. anything on the energy side? >> i think if you go back to the past oil flash gasoline spikes re
katrina and 9/11. this is actually a company that charles has talked about before. take a look at how the dollar is faring today. ♪ from local communities to local businesses. the potential of yelp unlocked. nyse euronext. unlocking the world's potential. to a currency market for everyone. the potential of fxcm unlocked. nyse euronext. unlocking the world's potential. >> 22 minutes past the hour. i am jamie colby with your fox news minute. some subways are rolling again. none of them are going into lower manhattan which is still without power. long lines to get a shuttle bus into the city. they carry more than 5 million people a day. the commuter railroads are providing service. in the meantime, all fares are waived through midnight tomorrow night. all three new york airports are back in service. even on a limited basis. laguardia was the last to come back online due to flooding. everyone should confirm flights before heading to the airport. president obama and mitt romney are back on the campaign trail. after three days focusing on the federal response to the storm, the president w
, there is debris everywhere but there isn't just devastation. this is an katrina that watch everything away. these buildings still exist. there is a heck of a clean up here to do but this can come back. a little worse down the beach in seaside heights and atlantic city but it will come back but look. look at this debris. junk everywhere. this is going to take a while. this is the roof of the tiki bar which is 300 yards up the beach. this was the roof of it and that is deposited here. i leave you with this shot at the atlantic ocean. it occurred to me today that as i look out there it is almost like nothing happened. the ocean is saying i was upset but i am calm now. i may not stay calm forever but you are good for while. connell: that pictures of beautiful and to come back to the isolation is jarring. what stood out to you today? today is the first day you had a chance to walk around the. >> exactly. the first sunny day. the first real nice day. you hit it exactly right. the contrast in the devastation and the beauty. this is typically what we see after hurricane. took a couple extra days b
know, put katrina at one end. that was $100 billion. put irene at another end. that was a $13 billion event. i've seen 30 to 50. it feels, especially after you see that aerial video of what happens on the shores of new jersey, like it may be more along the 30 to 50 range when you talk about total property damage and you talk also about lost business activity. it was down in wall street. >> especially at a time when the economy was -- there was a sense it was starting to slow down again. we haven't had the strongest economy anyway. are we more vulnerable to this? >> i don't want to say there's an up side to this, but you could have a situation where some of the construction and some of the rebuilding happens in the same quarter where you had the business loss, so you have a really net no change to gdp. if there are major construction projects undertaken -- for example, let's say they decide the biggest financial center in the world should not be a foot over sea level, that's a major investment that could have a positive back on gdp. >> that's a great point, steve. as far as the idea th
following a critical disaster. he got the port of new orleans up and running after hurricane katrina in 2005. gary lagrange joins us now from new orleans. welcome to the program. it is good to see you here. if the port of new york were to make a call to you and say, look, gary, you've done this before, what should we do? what would you say to them? >> well, first, i think the port of new york, new jersey is in great hands. admiral rick larabie has weathered the storm many times before. the communications aspect is first and foremost about anything. the pilots, noaa, coast guard, army corp of engineers, all staying in touch with each other to ensure that the port and the harbor can open just as quickly as possible to assure that the safeguard and movement of commerce is first safe, but also expeditious as well. because of the magnitude of a port like new york, new jersey, just is an absolute must. a huge market area. many consumers relying on it. >> more broadly, ceos who are obviously attempting to hold businesses together and ensure that they function, many of them in a very, very difficult
how much money geico has made since the katrina year, how much buffett has made? a fortune. what was that, 2005? >> yeah. >> but i do wonder if you did have trading this morning, what somebody look travelers or berkshire would be trading at. >> but weaved had less hurricanes since 2005 than you would think. >> refinery, do you know anything about the plants around here? >> i don't know the specific plans, but i know that's certainly a risk. about 7% of the nation's refining is done here in new jersey and dwell wear. and they're right in the path. absolutely right in the path. so i would expect to see those guys shut in if they haven't already. which will impact obviously gas prices. >> there was speculation how you could see oil prices drop because no one will be taking supply. >> that's true. absolutely. >> paul, thank you very much. you'll be in-house with us. >> i'm weathering the storm here. >> andrew, i'm not kidding, last week, a sociologist writing for the huffington "post" said if this doesn't get us to completely try to get off all fossil fuels as quickly as we possibly
're operating. this is cover of "the washington post." this is new york's katrina. obviously the death toll compared to that storm nowhere near approaching it but still 20 some odd people dead in new york alone. 2 million people without power. for those of you that live around here, we hope you're safe and your homes are okay and families are okay. if you're in other parts of the country or the world trying to trade today, there are going to be business decisions, trading decisions to be made. >> we don't know how badly the insurance is going to do. it's up to you. you may think it's bad for insurance. maybe it's good. we don't have a good ballpark of how much and more importantly, so much of the damage is flooding, which historically has been one of those things where you call the insurance company and they say did you read the fine print? we don't cover flooding. the federal government has at various times extended flood insurance and helped people. particularly when anyone remembers the fiasco where the federal government says, listen rich people, you can build beautiful houses again. th
, thanks. >> memories of hurricane katrina are inspiring one high school to come to the aid of hurricane sandy's victims. students and faculty on a mission to send a semitrailer stocked with canned foods, blankets and other item to the atlantic coast. great for them. meanwhile, hurricane sandy has left behind a trail of sadness for the lives and property lost in its wake. nbc's brian williams spent part of his childhood growing up near the beaches of the jersey shore. so yesterday he went back to assess the damage. >> reporter: in point pleasant beach, the white sands motel has been in business for 30 years. the pool is full of sand. this is what is left of one of the motel rooms. another shore landmark is jenks where cindy clous rolled out the storm in the local aquarium she runs. >> we heard this huge woosh. and within seconds the water level went from the first step up to the door knob. >> reporter: the power is still out. they're keeping the animals safe and alive with one generator. of course, it's supposed to be a little scary in here. you have the halloween decorations up. >> that
in the wake of a major disaster. so it's probably no surprise that back in 2005, hurricanes katrina and rita drained the fund and plunged the program $18 billion into debt. it's debt congress planned to forgive, but hasn't yet. that leaves the program on poor financial footing with only about $4 billion worth of funds available for claims related to sandy. >> from what i've seen, this could be a $5 billion to $10 billion flooding event, so more than likely, the program will have to go to congress to get additional borrowing authority. >> reporter: former program administrator david maurstad says the program will probably ve to turno coress for help paying claims. >> it's still an obligation that our government said we're going to have this program-- "you buy a policy, we're going to take care of it." and i have every confidence to believe that that will happen. there will be some mechanics that will be involved, possibly, depending on how large of an event this turns out to be. >> reporter: what could be a bigger problem are the number of people affected who don't have flood insurance. gener
. it depends how much of a long term impact there have been. we can go back to katrina which was the largest destruction where the actual costs were around $150 billion. >> you can go to our website to find out why new york is looking a lot leak amsterdam fp has something to do with bicycles. and you can tune in tonight at 8:00 p.m. for hurricane sandy coming together, a benefit concert to aid victims of the storm. hosted by matt lauer. the concert will feature performances by bruce springsteen, sting, billy joel. good line up. money collected will be donated to the american red cross relief effort. >> it's final for the jobs report due out at 8:30 achl and it is the final set of numbers and the most important set of numbers before tuesday's presidential election. most forecasts expect a slight rise in the unemployment rate to 7.9%. nonfarm payrolls expected to have a slight pick up from september. has hurricane sandy mitigated the impact or is it a key indicator? >> certainly everyone's focusing elsewhere, certainly i think as soon as people get this number, the first question is what will
with katrina. we learned with irene. we started with much larger cash supplies than we normally would have, and we've been able to manage that cash supply at a much higher level than we have right now than we've ever had before. >> tom: have you been able to replenish the cash supplies in those a.t.m. machines in a timely manner? >> we have been able to replenish. obviously, there will be an a.t.m. here or there that has a problem, that runs out of cash. there are lines at many of these a.t.m.s in the difficult areas, but even as the longest time, it's within the same day it's replenished. we do have story where's we move cash from one branch to the other to help the branches keep cash. we've beefed up the security force toking in throughout the tristate area. >> tom: frank, let me pull back a little bit from the day-to-day operations and i know you're focused on that. you have waived some bank fees for those affected customers in the region. is that going to be much of an impact when you talk about the fourth quarter business? >> i don't see this impact our fourth quarter business by wavi
to hurricane katrina. when that happened late august of 2005, both of these stocks were on the move up. both of them actually traded right near their all time high and in the last few years they tumbled. lowe's went to, and home depot ultimately with 21 with the cash of the market. and people who bought katrina, and long-term investment got waxed pretty good. fast forward, lowe's last time missed the street by a nickel and home depot beat by 4 cents and concensus estimates, and went up home depot, there's a downgrade recently on home depoe and two upgreats on lowe's. to me, i can lie home depot, i think they have better operators and storms and when the storm path went and i just happen to think it's a better operation, better historical execution, so i would be willing to pay extra for it, for both of the stocks. cheryl: and-- >> $30 for lowe's, 58 for home depot and break out 63 for home depot i think it takes off or break out at 33 for lowe's, that could be a takeoff point. cheryl: another positive, unfortunately, coming out of this storm you're going to have new construction and you're g
million without power in the south five days after hurricane katrina. some relief for those in manhattan, new york city mayor michael bloomberg promising that most of the burroughs power will be returned by midnight tonight. but any progress on that front has been severely undercut by long lines again -- attestations the new york governor saying he signed an executive order waiving a requirement that fuel tankers register and pay taxes before unloading insisting his order we will help get gasoline to consumers faster. it is estimated that two-thirds of gasoline stations in new jersey and new york are not in business right now. however, it is little comfort for people stuck for long hours in long lines to with no guarantee that they will get gas at the end of that line. but some people, at least some are beginning to dry. this is a very serious and frustrating matter for literally millions of people in this region. turning now to benghazi, almost two months after the terrorist attack that killed four americans, the cia has released a new timeline, a timeline of its actions suggesting it p
than triple what hurricane irene cost. but still far plea record costs of hurricane katrina several years ago. governor christy hie has pledgeo rebuild the shore but that would come at an even greater cost. and where he withstand, we have to tell you as we were driving in, there are actually school buses blocking the flooded roads. you can imagine with no school in session and very thin police availability given everything that's going on, all the emergency situations, they're use aing school buses to deter cars from going down dangerous roads.aing school buses to dete cars from going down dangerous roads.ing school buses to deters from going down dangerous roads. this boat was across the street and police have propped it up to get it out of the way so that emergency vehicles can keep going. of course that's the only way that you can get on the island here. back to you. >> have there been other people that you've seen out on the streets or is it pretty deserted aside from the emergency personnel? >> reporter: it's actually very deserted. and it's pretty eerie. i've seen all the pict
, the west coast. >> that was one of famous of our colleagues years ago, during katrina, we were talking about how many poles had been town and she looked in to the camera and said just know it stay calm, help is on the way. and we all said no one can hear you. they don't have power. it was a very heartfelt sincere help is on the way, but the people that needed it were not in front of the tv set at the time. >> you send out a reminder e-mail is down. >> and then by the time it's back up -- >> isn't it crazy that e-mail is work something. >> you're right, verizon was working. >> coming up, we'll talk to governor markell to check out the damage in delaware. well find out how his state made it through the night. up. a short word that's a tall order. up your game. up the ante. and if you stumble, you get back up. up isn't easy, and we ought to know. we're in the business of up. everyday delta flies a quarter of million people while investing billions improving everything from booking to baggage claim. we're raising the bar on flying and tomorrow we will up it yet again. governor of getting i
in lives and economic damage might be less than katrina. i know our insurance analyst has talked about the size of the liability being half, which is good news. and i think there's going to be some affect on auto sales and consumer retail spending. but, again, if those stocks take a dip, that's going to be a pretty big opportunity. because we know when you have to fix a broken window you end up with more spending. overall, this could be a boost to the economy. i think it's going to be viewed as an opportunity. i think we're seeing in some of the premarket activity. >> i never know really whether to believe that or not. i see with insurance companies and i've seen the case made, the broken window case that you eventually have to fix it. net net, replacing things that may have been -- didn't need replacing and using capital to do that, i can't believe that, you know, spending $20 billion on what you didn't have to do before can be net net be good long-term. is that really true? is that the case that economists make? >> well, i think it depends on how much credit is involved. in other wor
does to the economy. >> it does have a big impact, though. because back to katrina for example. that was $75 billion of insured losses. which meant that the economic losses were over $100 billion. so usual talking a very big deal here. companies start to assess how much the business was disrupted. accessibility to their business. the ability of their employees to come to work. you don't start to see contamination issues and environmental issues until later on. but it's unfortunate to say and you asked me a very valid question, it's unfortunate to say that i think this number could be very big. >> the other question is who pays for all of this because the flooding, a lot of this will go to the national flood insurance program. but at some point, who ends up picking up the tab. >> i think mostly the insurance companies, becky. there's three sources of ways to fund catastrophes. you have the national flood insurance program as you mentioned, but that's under fema. fema stands for federal emergency management agency. and that's basically a response mechanism and i think they're doi
resources well. i think government will perform well. this is not going to be katrina. when government performs well, they t re-emphasizes in people's minds that government does matter. >> what's your take on the early voting story? you have a new poll showing governor romney still in the lead and certainly they're tied, 47% each, cwhen you look at eary voting turnout. how much of an impact does this storm have on early voting turnout? >> well, some, but so many people have voted. look at ohio. a third of the voters have will be cast their votes. i think early voting has helped with the democratic base. i think the democratic base has gotten more and more enthusiastic, more and more fired up. you're seeing that with the long lines in places in urban centers which tend to be democratic. i think it's going to be a surprisingly good democratic turn youtd. >> all right. we'll leave it there. governor, good to have you on the program. >>> let's go back to julia boorst boorstin. we have more on the disney/lucas film deal. >> that's right, maria. walt disney is acquiring lucas films for $4.05
sandy didn't hit oil production facilities like hurricanes in the past, like katrina did in the gulf of mexico. so while folks are struggling in the northeast, i definitely sympathize, the situation could have been a lot worse if it hit some of the bigger petroleum sector infrastructure systems. >> and so you said prices in some parts of the country are going down. where do you think prices go in the near future? >> well, i think in pockets of the northeast that continue to be hit with supply crunches, you're going to see price increases. but for the next several weeks, i think you're going to see ripple effects of lower prices across most parts of the country. >> i see. all right. we'll leave it there. good to have you on the program, sir. thank you so much. >> my pleasure. >> see you soon. >>> up next, countdown the closely watched jobs report out first thing tomorrow morning. we'll give you the handicapping of it. stay with us. uh, i'm in a timeout because apparently riding the dog like it's a small horse is frowned upon in this establishment! luckily though, ya know, i conceal th
it? >> fema responds rather adroitly to -- katrina notwithstanding, to these disasters. i suspect they're going to be quite responsive right now for those who have been displaced, who have lost family members, who don't have homes. i think there will be a rapid response from the federal government. >> i'm just saying, we could use that money in other areas right now. not necessarily the bond buying program. just an observation. >> maria, i got say, i don't know if the bond buying is actually helping. we're seeing a lot of bond buying. i don't know where that money is going to. we see unemployment raising. >> is survey showed pick ups in demand for most classes in lending right now. so it has had a positive effect in a place where it could matter. we have seen in general some of the interest rates that matter go down in the economy, including mortgages. >> and a big uptick in housing. >> maybe not perfect, but it seems to have had an effect. >> do we anticipate the typical pickup in economic activity following a natural disaster of this magnitude here, ron? >> bill, listen, it's go
people off the roofs of their homes, very reminiscent of what we saw with hurricane katrina. we have to take a short break. when we come back in just a moment, we'll continue to update you on the breaking stories we're following in the wake of this severe storm and tell you where sandy is headed next and assessing the damage left in her wake. back right after this. [ female announcer ] a classic meatloaf recipe from stouffer's starts with ground beef, unions, and peppers baked in a ketchup glaze with savory gravy and mashed russet potatoes. what makes stouffer's meatloaf best of all? that moment you enjoy it at home. stouffer's. let's fix dinner. boring. boring. [ jack ] after lauren broke up with me, i went to the citi private pass page and decided to be...not boring. that's how i met marilyn... giada... really good. yes! [ jack ] ...and alicia. ♪ this girl is on fire [ male announcer ] use any citi® card to get the benefits of private pass. more concerts. more events. more experiences. [ jack ] hey, who's boring now? [ male announcer ] get more access with a citi card. [ crowd c
catastrophic events before, and katrina and others, and life, you know, as disastrous as it is and upsetting as it is, you know, we move beyond it. you know, these are acts of nature not acts of man necessarily, and so we'll deal with, we'll deal with the bumps and move on. and in terms of the overall economy, i'm sure it's going to take some kind of bump, but i think the overall economy has got more issues, unfortunately, than the effects of hurricane sandy. neil: and always a pleasure through crisis alike, we're about six minutes to the opening bell and keep in mind this is halloween, there's been a move afoot in the garden state, new jersey, chris christie, we already knew he was a very power governor and he wants to move it to november 3rd, so the kids can trick-or-treat on november 3 and my sons i know are watching, guys, you know the rules, the candy, you know, some for you, some for me. we'll have more. [laughter] and everyone, everyone, stick around. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] how do you engineer a true automotive breakthrough? ♪ you give it bold new styling, unsurpassed luxury and
Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)

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